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The Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research Library

The CFAR Library aims to make classic Lacanian texts available in English for the first time, as well as publishing original research in the Lacanian field. The editors of the series are Anouchka Grose, Darian Leader and Alan Rowan and it is published by Karnac Books. Please click on a book cover below to view the full details and purchase via the Karnac website.

 
  Cottet

Freud's invention of psychoanalysis was based on his own desire to know something about the unconscious, but what have been the effects of this original desire on psychoanalysis ever since? How has Freud's desire created symptoms in the history of psychoanalysis? Has it helped or hindered its transmission?

Exploring these questions brings Serge Cottet to Lacan's concept of the psychoanalyst's desire: less a particular desire like Freud's and more a function, this is what allows analysts to operate in their practice. It emerges during analysis and is crucial in enabling the analysand to begin working with the unconscious of others when they take on the position of analyst themselves. What is this function and how can it be traced in Freud's work?

 
  Gessert

Lacan developed his theory and practice of psychoanalysis on the basis of Freud’s original work. In his “return to Freud” he did not only elaborate and revise some of Freud’s innovative ideas, but turned to important questions and problems in Freud’s theory that had remained obscure and unresolved, and provided a new way of articulating these issues and their implication for psychoanalytic theory and practice.

This book offers a selection of introductory lectures given at the Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research (CFAR) about some of the fundamental concepts of psychoanalysis which aim at exploring the trajectory of their development from their original basis in Freud’s work to their elaboration by Lacan.

 
  Morel

How does one become a man or a woman? Psychoanalysis shows that this is never an easy task and that each of us tackles it in our own, unique way. In this important and original study, Genevieve Morel focuses on what analytic work with psychotic subjects can teach us about the different solutions human beings can construct to the question of sexual identity.

Through a careful exposition of Lacanian theory, Morel argues that classical gender theory is misguided in its notion of 'gender identity' and that Lacan's concept of 'sexuation' is more precise. Clinical case studies illustrate how sexuation occurs and the ambiguities that may surround it. In psychosis, these ambiguities are often central, and Morel explores how they may or may not be resolved thanks to the individual's own constructions.

 
  Soler

Has Jacques Lacan’s impact on psychoanalysis really been assessed? His formulation that the Freudian unconscious is “structured like a language” is well-known, but this was only the beginning. There was then the radically new thesis of the “real unconscious”. Why this step?

Searching for the Ariadne’s thread that runs throughout Lacan’s ever-evolving teaching, this book illuminates the questions implicit to each step, and sheds new light on his revisions and renewals of psychoanalytic concepts. In tracing these, Colette Soler brings out their consequences for the clinic, and in particular, for the subject, for symptoms, for affects, and for the aims of treatment itself.

 
  Tardits

If psychoanalysis, for Freud, was an impossible profession, what consequences would this have for psychoanalytic training? And if one's own personal analysis lay at the heart of psychoanalytic training, how could what one had learnt from this be transmitted, let alone taught?

In this groundbreaking book, Annie Tardits explores the many attempts that analysts have made to think through the problems of psychoanalytic training. Moving from Freud and his first students through to Lacan and his invention of the 'pass', Tardits charts the changing conceptions of psychoanalytic training. With clarity and elegance, she shows how different ideas of what psychoanalysis is will have effects on how training is understood.

 
  Zafiropoulos

Lacan and Levi-Strauss are often mentioned together in reviews of French structuralist thought, but what really links their distinct projects? In this important study, Markos Zafiropoulos shows how Lacan's famous 'return to Freud' was only made possible through Lacan's reading of Levi-Strauss. Via a careful and illuminating comparison of the work of the psychoanalyst and that of the anthropologist, Zafiropoulos shows how Lacan's theories of the symbolic function, of the power of language, of the role of the father and even of the unconscious itself owe a major debt to Levi-Strauss.

Lacan and Levi-Strauss is much more than an academic study of the relations between these two thinkers: it is also a superb introduction to the work of Lacan, setting out with detail and lucidity the major concepts of his work in the 1950s.